Tag - Ambassador

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Worldcoo Ambassador network keeps growing!
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She is Leyre Moreno, our ambassador in Santiago de Chile
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Today we introduce you Jordi and Joana, our two ambassadors in Africa
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54% of the project released !
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How important are ambassadors of peace?
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Jean Ziegler, an ambassador for hunger

Worldcoo Ambassador network keeps growing!

Today we introduce you Patrick, our new ambassador in Nepal.

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DSC00409 (1)Patrick has always had a strong social commitment. During all his life, he has collaborated and participated with so many projects and social causes, such as the fight against gender violence, animal abuse or the care of elderly people. But it’s now when Patrick is going to face what will surely be the most powerful experience of his life.

Patrick, sales engineer from Holland, took a flight to Nepal at the beginning of February.  His purpose was visiting and collaborating with different NGOs from the country. The first one was Street Child, organization which we have collaborated in several occasions.  

Following, Patrick explains us a little bit more why he started this adventure and how was his first experience in Katmandu.

  • Welcome on board to our Ambassador Program, Patrick! Why did you start this new adventure?

Thank you so much for the introduction! Sometimes, we don’t realize about how quickly live goes, and this is what happened to me. School, institute, university, internship, first work, second work… And all of this inside my happiness bubble. During my university studies I had a dream, and it was to travel around countries very much different from mine. This dream was never fulfilled. But some months ago, making auto-introspection, I rescued the idea and as now I don’t have so many familiar obligations and before continuing my personal career, I decided to make this dream come true.

  • Why Nepal and not any other country?

Because I wanted to go to a country very different from mine: different culture, social conditioning, everything I’m used to and where I could help.  There was a lot of countries where I would like to live, so it was quite difficult to take a decision. But I love the mountain, so I finally decided to visit Himalaya, the biggest aspiration I could ever have. Moreover, I got the chance to help a mountain guide, Shiva, with his company, Himkala Adventure, which, at the same time, help as much as possible to the people of his native area, Gorkha (epicenter of the 2015 earthquakes). So the decision was made on its own.

  • What do you expect to do here? Explain us a little bit more about the projects you will visit and what will be your role.  

DSC00405 (1)Two weeks ago, we went to my host hometown, Shiva, where I left most of the material and clothes I could bring from Barcelona, as well as participate in a traditional Hindu wedding, all very enriching.

Some days ago, I visited an orphanage, Possible Nepal, which I could contact via Couchsurfing. I could bought some food for some days, as well as scholarly material. I also could help with the translation of some documents and I played with the kids, who are very nice. A council for those who want to buy material there and bring it to Nepal: keep your budget and buy in Kathmandu, you can get 10 times more material. To give you an idea, with 12 € we buy 60 kg of potatoes, and with 9 € 44 workbooks.

In addition, I will visit Shed The Light Nepal, a joint iniciative between Australia and Nepal who work for peace, the reconstruction after hearthwater, help children, and empowering women in Nepal. As a Worldcoo Ambassador, I have just visited the NGO Street Child Nepal in order to see what are they doing there, who are they helping and how are they doing it.

  • What has impressed you the most?

The good mood with which people of Nepal carry the difficulties. Although the salary of most of them is very low, there are a lot of people without home because of earthquakes, collapsed buildings, pollution and poverty, they are the most pleasant and friendly people I could ever met. And I could understand a certain resentment towards the tourists, who just go there to do trekking in their mountains. But that doesn’t happen. Children, elderly people, everyone. Despite all the difficulties, they go ahead with many more smiles than most people you see in European cities.

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  • You have visited a school that Street Child built in order that children from immigrant families working in brick factories could have access to education. What has been your impression?

It has been great, and it has been a very interesting and surprising experience. There are a lot of concepts that one doesn’t think about: that there is a season for brick making, winter, avoiding the rainy season because bricks are dried outdoors before going through the oven; That workers are generally from villages outside the Kathmandu valley, and even from India, and that they are attracted by the security of 6 months of work.

The work of Street Child of Nepal, together with Kopila Nepal, is very good and helps on many fronts at the same time: it gives education to the sons and daughters of families who work in the brick factory, but also guarantees they are safe and well cared for, and thanks to all this gives better working conditions to those who work there. They know that their children are close, learning and well cared for.

  • How would you describe people who live there?

It is not easy to live there, in a special cabins between the bricks they are building, with so many animals and very far away from their homes. Despite all of this bad conditions, they are happy, polite and with a permanent smile. They are very optimist, so it makes one wonder what we do wrong in places where there is more wealth to have such high rates of depression and intolerance

  • What do you think that are the most needs that they have right now?

DSC00402 (1)I don’t know how I could start. On the first hand, there is not many work in small villages, so they have to go to the city. Moreover, the best opportunities and education are in the metropolis, so they come here both for them and their children.

Related to the project, there’s a small school with one unique space and two toilets and a fence that closes the playtime space. It’s really good, because the structure and foundations are solid, earthquake-proof, and the idea is to have the basics, and that’s achieved. But there are limitations that requires more funds.

For example, there are a lot of employees who come from India and their children can’t go to school because they can’t do two classes in two different languages: Nepali and Hindi. So they need to build one more space for Indian kids.

In addition, there are many more boys and girls than can be admitted in the classroom, so they could also build another module just to accommodate more children.

Then, at the end of the brick season, families return to their homes and the school closes, basically because of the lack of funds, and the service is provided in the work season because it is when there is more need. With a little more, given that the physical structure and material is a non-recurring expense, the school could be maintained open throughout the year, thus giving fixed work to the teachers, and serving the children of the zone.

In short, more modules like the one they already built, one to accommodate more Nepali children and one to teach in Hindi, as well as more funds that could  help to maitain the shcool open all year, would be very useful for them. 

  • Can you share with us some anecdote?

DSC00412 (1)About the kids: before leaving, the teacher told us to wait there because the kids had something for us. One girl came to me and gave me a drawing that remind me about mandala, with small and lighting stars and with a message inside: “Welcome to Kopila preparatory class”. She gave another drawing to my friend, Duncan Peat, and both of us thanked her with a lot of “dhanyabhadh”, “thank you” in Nepalese. Luckily, I had sweets in my bag and we could gave them some. It was the perfect goodbye for this wonderful visit with a strong message: we can contribute and help them a lot with so little effort. 

Patrick is now a Worldcoo Ambssador and his adventure in Nepal has just begun, so keep tuned!

You can follow him through his LinkedIn. 

Worldcoo Team.

She is Leyre Moreno, our ambassador in Santiago de Chile

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When we met Leyre, we instantly realized that she would be a great candidate for our Ambassadors Program (click HERE if you want to know a little bit more).

Leyre comes from Toledo, but she has lived in many others cities and countries, like Madrid, Edinburgh or Santiago de Chile, where she actually lives.

She loves traveling and know many other cultures; this is the reason why she decided to move to the other hemisphere one year ago.

As Worldcoo’s ambassador, Leyre will help us to know the social needs there are in Chile, identify possible project opportunities and, if there’s the case, visit some of the projects that we are helping to fund there and audit it.

If you want to know a little bit more about her, don’t miss the following interview.

  • leyre_blogLeyre, tell us a little bit more about you…

I’m passionate about traveling, exploring every corner of the cities where I live, know their culture and their people, walking and breathe pure air away from the city, always with my camera in hand, and live at the rhythm of the swing.

  • Why did you decide to move to Chile?

The destination, in particular, was for personal reasons. But I already had taken  the decision to leave my country and start again in other place, motivated by the bad expectations of the future in Spain after finishing my studies and the desire to know new places and cultures, to continue learning, discovering and growing.

  • Where do you actually work?

I currently work in an NGO from Chile, called FIMA, as administration and finance coordinator, as well as supporting the projects department. Our mission is to actively promote the right to live in a healthy environment and ensure the protection of the Chile’s environmental heritage. Our work, therefore, focuses on environmental justice, the empowerment of vulnerable communities and the conservation of the environment and biodiversity protection.

  • What do you like the most about Chile?

I admire the nature that the country offers – it’s absolutely breathtaking the diversity of landscapes that you can find here; I value the human team with which I have the luck to work with and the strength and perseverance with which many of the citizens of this country fight for their rights.

  • Why do you think that is it extremely important that companies are committed to CSR policies?

I really think that if the development isn’t sustainable, it is not development. It is impossible to proceed in economic terms if we don’t take into account the human rights, exploiting and destroying the environment where we live and obviate the life forms of people occupying each territory.

For this reason, the fact that companies are increasingly commited to CSR policies means that they are realizing that you can’t go ahead in a way that is foreign to your social and ecological environment. And this change of business logic, benefits the whole society.

  • Why do you think it is important that all of us play our part, no matter how small it could be?

Because of my professional experience, I know how difficult if for an NGO to implement their projects because of economic problems. It is very frustrating having lots of ideas and not being able to implement them because of the lack of funds to implement them.

That’s why it is very important that every of us collaborate with different kind of ways, donations are very important, even if they are very small. Together, we can make big things happen.

Leyre, if you could ask for a wish, it would be… teleport me :)

Over the next few weeks we will know a little more about Leyre’s new experience, so stay tuned! 😉

If you want, you can follow Leyre on their social networks: Facebook and LinkedIn.

Worldcoo Team.

Today we introduce you Jordi and Joana, our two ambassadors in Africa

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“It is like a mathematic proportion: the less people in one country has, more friendly and generous is people who live there”.

It was late last summer when we met Jordi and Joana, two young Catalans who had decided to embark on a new adventure and travel around the African continent.

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Jordi and Joana, our two ambassadors in Africa

A friend of them had talked about our ambassador program – our international network of collaborators who help us identify and audit many of the social projects we are involved with – and that’s how we met.

Based on the route they had in mind, we planned their visit to some of the cooperation projects that we are currently helping to financein Africa.

What motivated them to embark on this adventure? What challenges are they encountering? What is their journey like? If you want to know a little more of them, keep reading!

Jordi and Joana, 6 months in Africa and 6 more in Central Asia. What has led you to venture into this new project?

For some time ago, we always wanted to do a long trip and the idea that motivated us most was to know part of the African continent. We had the feeling that we could find very authentic people there, very different ways of living and a spectacular nature. In addition, it was a very big challenge for us because of the way of traveling, totally different from how we had been doing so far. For now, all our expectations have been fulfilled!

When and how did you take this decision?

We had been waiting for the right conditions for 4 years. In 2010 we made a similar trip in Asia and then, back here, it was quite difficult to find a job and to re-establish our lives. So, when we found the way to go without losing our current job, we made the final decision.

What have you done so far?

So far, we have met the people in Madagascar, we have been relaxing for a few days in the Seychelles, we have explored the most isolated corners of Kenya, the nature of Uganda has surprised us and we have enjoyed the green of Rwanda. To all this, one of the most intense moments that we have lived have been the visits to Tuum (Kenya) and Patongo (Uganda) as ambassadors of Worldcoo.

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What has surprised you the most?

We have been surprised about many things, and most of them are related to the people.  For example, seeing the isolation and simplicity with which many people live in these countries, it takes more than half an hour to get closer to children who had never seen European people. And one thing that we have already seen but it does not stop surprising us is to see that the less has the population of a country, the more friendly and generous are the people that live there. It looks like a mathematical proportion.

What has been the biggest challenge so far?

Without any doubt, visiting the social project in Tuum and then continue to Lake Turkana, Kenya. It is one of the most inhospitable and isolated areas where we have ever been. Most of these villages do not have any kind of transportation that connects them to each other and we had been waiting 5 hours for a vehicle to pass through the dirt road. Even so, the reward was greater than the difficulty.

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As you know, our network of ambassadors helps us identify social projects and visit them in order to guarantee total transparency in everything. In the coming days, we will share with you their experience in the village of Tuum (Kenya) and Patongo (Uganda), where we are currently collaborating to improve the living conditions of children and adolescents.

Worldcoo Team.

54% of the project released !

Congratulations everybody, you did half of it. Let’s have a look at the figures…

You are 93 Donors from 15 different countries!

Most of you are from Spain, but we have people from all over the world! Argentina, Germany, Nicaragua, México, United Kingdom, Panama, Sahara, Denmark, Rwanda, Ecuador, Switzerland, United States, Venezuela, and Austria.

You raised 2,705€ with an average of 30€ per donor.

We’ve seen a good growth of the project, if you look at the graph, you’ll find that the founds are growing regularly but you have to keep going. According to it, we should expect 100% of the project by June 25th.

So, what’s next? Now you have to tell your friends, your family, your coworkers or classmates and everybody that the project needs their help!

The best way to achieve it is to spread the maximum with your community and explain them why it is so important to form ambassadors of peace (see the previous article).

We count on you! Support the project on Worldcoo.

How important are ambassadors of peace?

As Vicent Martínez Guzmán, founder of the Master’s program says : “There is not only one way of understanding peace. There are many ways of making peace, as there are diverse people and cultures”.

Indeed, to understand and to be able to reflect about peace, a specific and strong program has to be followed. That is what the Master program of the University Jaume I provides. The faculty staff come from prestigious and internationally recognized renowned universities and institutions of peace. In this way, they promote education in Co-development, Communication of peace, Conflict, Democracy, Gender, Humanitarian aid, Human rights, Peace cultures, Peace theories, and Post colonial studies among others.

An ambassador of peace has to be a representative of his state. His mission is to disseminate informations in order to keep peace and establish good relationships with other states. But the peace knowledges are not easy to get. The program that the Peace Master UJI is trying to finance is the one which can teach these knowledges.

A student from an impoverished country needs you, because his country needs you, and because we are all concerned about the peace in the world. Donate for the Worldcoo project to engage in one of the most important causes of our beautiful world (yes it is!), or just share the project with your friends, your family, and your community!

Help us spread the peace!

Jean Ziegler, an ambassador for hunger

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Jean Ziegler is a Switzerland politician and professor. During his life, he held several posts : Member of Parliament in the Federal Assembly of Switzerland, professor of sociology in Genava and Paris, and member of the Advisor Committee of the UN Human Rights Council. He also had some responsibilities within the United Nations as Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food.

He tracked Noma which touch malnourished children, and ravages their faces. To end this problem, Ziegler has worked with states and UN institutions to make them aware of this disease and push them to join the efforts of NGOs.

In February 2012, he presented a study from the Human Rights Council to the Advisor Committee. That study reports that Noma can be prevented by tracking malnutrition, moreover Noma is certainly a neglected disease. Finally, a global approach is needed to monitor the incidence.

Today, Jean Ziegler is well know for this sentence :
“A child who dies from hunger is a murdered child.”

Ziegler believes  in a better world and dedicated a huge part of his life to human rights. What do you think about that, are you going to follow the steps of this great man ? If yes, just donate for this Worldcoo project!

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