Tag - Diseases

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Ocular hygiene in Mozambique
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Jean Ziegler, an ambassador for hunger
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Preventing Noma is a must, but, what happens with ill children?
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Fundació Campaner has helped 25 children to solve the cleft lip
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Eradicating Noma in Diffa is closer thanks to Eva Cosmetics
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Disease against children

Ocular hygiene in Mozambique

The vast majority of eye diseases could be treated simply by the knowledge and skills of a trained Ophthalmologist. In fact, most of them are easily cured in Europe, but in Mozambique they become chronic due to the lack of available professionals.

With this Worldcoo project, the NGO Ocularis aims to help more than 500.000 people who face eye problems in Mozambique. 50% of the cases of child blindness could be easily prevented by a minimum healthcare.

The money raised will allow to send 4 professional specialist doctors in order to dispense training courses to 7 local ophthalmologists and 30 technicians. The final objective is simple, make a campaign for local nurses to be able to take care of the eye hygiene (having a good habits would remove half of the eye disease of children.), and help to achieve the most delicate surgery operations.

The problem has been clearly identified, the solution is simple, they just need to raise 6.400€ to make it happens. Donate for the project and spread the word!

Jean Ziegler, an ambassador for hunger

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Jean Ziegler is a Switzerland politician and professor. During his life, he held several posts : Member of Parliament in the Federal Assembly of Switzerland, professor of sociology in Genava and Paris, and member of the Advisor Committee of the UN Human Rights Council. He also had some responsibilities within the United Nations as Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food.

He tracked Noma which touch malnourished children, and ravages their faces. To end this problem, Ziegler has worked with states and UN institutions to make them aware of this disease and push them to join the efforts of NGOs.

In February 2012, he presented a study from the Human Rights Council to the Advisor Committee. That study reports that Noma can be prevented by tracking malnutrition, moreover Noma is certainly a neglected disease. Finally, a global approach is needed to monitor the incidence.

Today, Jean Ziegler is well know for this sentence :
“A child who dies from hunger is a murdered child.”

Ziegler believes  in a better world and dedicated a huge part of his life to human rights. What do you think about that, are you going to follow the steps of this great man ? If yes, just donate for this Worldcoo project!

Preventing Noma is a must, but, what happens with ill children?

Fundació Campaner’s first priority is to prevent Noma. As we have already explained here, the project: the fenced area for crops construction is a fundamental goal to avoid malnutrition in Diffa, one of the principal causes of the disease.

The WHO (World Health Oraganization) estimates that 140,000 new cases of Noma occur each year and of these, only 10% survive. That means that 126,000 die each year, mainly in sub-Saharan countries from Senegal to Ethiopia, a region known as “the Noma belt”.

Thus, the prevention is fundamental, but there are also lots of children infected who need to be treated. Its treatment is very easy and cheap: if the condition is detected in the early stage, progression can be prevented with only the use of mild antibiotics and immediate nutritional rehabilitation. Fundació Campaner is also aware of this, and they have decided to start the construction of a hospital in Diffa, Niger. Fundació Campaner wants to make everybody part of it, feeling complicit with the sick and underprivileged children assistance in the country.

Worldcoo gives its full support to this foundation and its projects, because we believe we can change Diffa’s children reality.

They are not guilty of their situation. They all deserve something better and you can change it. It’s up to you. Are you in?

Fundació Campaner has helped 25 children to solve the cleft lip

The cleft lip is a birth defect lip fissure consisting of a crack or separation in the upper lip. It is estimated that some environmental factors (such as certain medicines, drugs, lack of vitamins,…) can react with certain specific genes and thus infect the normal procedure of the palate and lip creation. The embryo’s head is formed during the first six to eight weeks of pregnancy.

In Niger there is a considerable number of children suffering from this malformation. In this case it is likely to be caused by malnutrition of the mother in gestation length.

In 2012, Fundació Campaner subsidized surgery to solve this disease for 25 children, who are often discriminated by the society due to Noma.

These interventions have been carried out by Nigerian doctors. Health services in Niger are payable, which means that most parents of the children suffering from Noma have no possibilities to pay the surgery. Through collaborations like the Fundació Campaner conducted in the area, these children may have a more dignified life and are prevented from social discrimination.

Source: Fundació Campaner’s Report.

Eradicating Noma in Diffa is closer thanks to Eva Cosmetics

Eva Cosmetics has become Worldcoo’s first sponsor. This company, who has passed Worldcoo’s ethic code, has decided to give one euro for each euro given by their customers. If you are one of their costumers, when buying through their web platform, we will find the option to give one euro to the project they have selected, in this case is the one we have in Niger, “Construction of a fenced for crops”, from Fundació Campaner. If the costumer does it, the company will double it.

Eva cosmetics takes care of the environment, as well at it’s a company who cares about health and beauty of people. They have decided to support this project because it tries to eradicate Noma, the disease against children, by building a fenced area for crops.

Worldcoo feels proud to have this dynamic and interesting company as a sponsor.

Disease against children

Noma is an easily curable disease but, regrettably, it’s fearfully reported by the World Health Organisation (WHO) that it may be on the increase in various African countries.

Noma (cancrum oris) is an acute and ravaging gangrenous infection affecting the face. The victims of Noma are mainly children under the age of 6, caught in a vicious circle of extreme poverty and chronic malnutrition. It starts with ulcers in the mouth. If the condition is detected in the early stage, progression can be prevented with the use of mild antibiotics and immediate nutritional rehabilitation. If left untreated, as happens in most cases, the ulcers progress to Noma at an alarming pace. The next stage is extremely painful when the cheeks or lips begin to swell and the victim’s general condition deteriorates. Within a few days, the swelling increases and a blackish furrow appears and the gangrenous process sets in and, after the scab falls away and a gaping hole is left in the face. It is estimated that the mortality rate reaches up to an alarming 90%.

The WHO estimates that 140,000 new cases of Noma occur each year and of these, a mere 10% survive. That means that 126,000 die each year, mainly in sub-Saharan countries from Senegal to Ethiopia, a region known as “the Noma belt”.

Source: The WHO.

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