Tag - Healthcare

1
The right to see in Mozambique
2
Improving women’s health conditions in Sankuru region
3
Malnutrition affects also Bluefields
4
Preventing Noma is a must, but, what happens with ill children?
5
Governance matters most in sustainable economic development. Ethiopia is doing well
6
Fundació Campaner has helped 25 children to solve the cleft lip
7
Disease against children

The right to see in Mozambique

The Right to See has been set as a priority in the world’s development agenda by the World Health Organization. The objective is to eradicate avoidable blindness by 2020. Mozambique is one of the most affected countries in the world, counting with a 500.000 eye diseased population and as few as 8 professional ophthalmologists.

Acknowledging that most of these diseases could be prevented by a minimum health care, we at Worldcoo believe we have the power to change things. With the help of our visionary sponsor Cottet, the project “Out of sight, not out of mind” could make the difference. By bringing an ophthalmologic training course to the Central Hospital of Maputo doctors and nurses, and treating 80 eye patients, Ocularis surgeons will help improve Mozambique health care system.

Help us bring Mozambique a new vision for a brighter future.   

Improving women’s health conditions in Sankuru region

Women’s health has become in the latest years one of the top issues on world development’s agenda, as it is a factor of gender inequality and worldwide disparities in access to healthcare. Cervical cancer is one of the most common feminine diseases. With its 270.000 deaths every year, of which more than 85% are count up in developing countries, cervical cancer is a clear exemplification of women’s health nowadays challenges. According to World Health Organization: “the high mortality rate from cervical cancer globally (52%) could be reduced by effective screening and treatment programs”.
This is why at Worldcoo we are committed with Pobles Germans and supported by Col·legi de Metges de Barcelona to promote cervical cancer awareness and health coverage in Sankuru region (Democratic Republic of Congo).
And thanks to MeQuedoUno and its generous customers who have allowed us to raise 1300€ in less than a month for cervical cancer in Sankuru it is becoming a reality. Keep going so we can help improve women’s health conditions in this region and make a difference!

Malnutrition affects also Bluefields

Bluefields and its communities are experimenting an increase of malnutrition among childs under 12, as it publishes El Periódico de Nicaragua in this article.

In order to know the nutritional status of children under 12 in the city of Bluefields and the communities of Kukra River, Punta Gorda and Rama Cay, the Spanish NGO Icnelia in coordination with the Nicaraguan Ministry of Health conducted, since 2010, a descriptive study of 3.187 childs, which represent about the 20% of the census.

The study reveals that 20.23% of children under 12 in the city of Bluefields and its communities have some degree of nutritional deficit, which is twice what the World Health Organization (WHO) found in 2005 in the same area.

Also the World Food Programme for the South Atlantic Autonomous Region found an increase of 13.03% in the level of child malnutrition compared with the 2005 results.

Helping this communities in its empowerment, is the best way to ensure a good nutrition to childs. A good example of this usefull help is the Processing cocoa in the rural communities of Kukra River project from Desos NGO.

Let’s make a real change in Bluefields.

Are you in?

Preventing Noma is a must, but, what happens with ill children?

Fundació Campaner’s first priority is to prevent Noma. As we have already explained here, the project: the fenced area for crops construction is a fundamental goal to avoid malnutrition in Diffa, one of the principal causes of the disease.

The WHO (World Health Oraganization) estimates that 140,000 new cases of Noma occur each year and of these, only 10% survive. That means that 126,000 die each year, mainly in sub-Saharan countries from Senegal to Ethiopia, a region known as “the Noma belt”.

Thus, the prevention is fundamental, but there are also lots of children infected who need to be treated. Its treatment is very easy and cheap: if the condition is detected in the early stage, progression can be prevented with only the use of mild antibiotics and immediate nutritional rehabilitation. Fundació Campaner is also aware of this, and they have decided to start the construction of a hospital in Diffa, Niger. Fundació Campaner wants to make everybody part of it, feeling complicit with the sick and underprivileged children assistance in the country.

Worldcoo gives its full support to this foundation and its projects, because we believe we can change Diffa’s children reality.

They are not guilty of their situation. They all deserve something better and you can change it. It’s up to you. Are you in?

Governance matters most in sustainable economic development. Ethiopia is doing well

Douglas Beal of the Boston Consulting Group and Andy Ratcliffe of the Africa Governance Initiative, share lessons in The Guardian on how developing countries are turning wealth into wellbeing for their citizens. This video talk about it, and share different examples to understand the reality of this countries and what are they politics respect the sustainable economic development.

Beal defend that there are things that can be done to improve the wellbeing of population which doesn’t required money, “it’s all related in making the right decisions”. He uses Ethiopia as an example of a government that is doing it in the right way. “Ethiopia is actually one of the countries that are the strongest in translating the improvements in their wealth into improvements in wellbeing”, Beal says. “One of the things they have really improved is healthcare and also outcomes of healthcare”. They did it focusing the improvement on what they were wrong: “rather than being reactionary to a particular disease is about getting into the communities, hider communities healthier workers to go out, explain that access to clean water can prevent diseases, uses of condoms,… and all other things that can prevent the need for greater healthcare in the future”, explains.

In their opinion, Ethiopia is very successful at doing that. It has changed in recent years and its evolution is well, but they still have lots of problems to solve. This is why the work done by NGO’s like Intermon Oxfam in there is still needed.

Source: The Guardian.

Fundació Campaner has helped 25 children to solve the cleft lip

The cleft lip is a birth defect lip fissure consisting of a crack or separation in the upper lip. It is estimated that some environmental factors (such as certain medicines, drugs, lack of vitamins,…) can react with certain specific genes and thus infect the normal procedure of the palate and lip creation. The embryo’s head is formed during the first six to eight weeks of pregnancy.

In Niger there is a considerable number of children suffering from this malformation. In this case it is likely to be caused by malnutrition of the mother in gestation length.

In 2012, Fundació Campaner subsidized surgery to solve this disease for 25 children, who are often discriminated by the society due to Noma.

These interventions have been carried out by Nigerian doctors. Health services in Niger are payable, which means that most parents of the children suffering from Noma have no possibilities to pay the surgery. Through collaborations like the Fundació Campaner conducted in the area, these children may have a more dignified life and are prevented from social discrimination.

Source: Fundació Campaner’s Report.

Disease against children

Noma is an easily curable disease but, regrettably, it’s fearfully reported by the World Health Organisation (WHO) that it may be on the increase in various African countries.

Noma (cancrum oris) is an acute and ravaging gangrenous infection affecting the face. The victims of Noma are mainly children under the age of 6, caught in a vicious circle of extreme poverty and chronic malnutrition. It starts with ulcers in the mouth. If the condition is detected in the early stage, progression can be prevented with the use of mild antibiotics and immediate nutritional rehabilitation. If left untreated, as happens in most cases, the ulcers progress to Noma at an alarming pace. The next stage is extremely painful when the cheeks or lips begin to swell and the victim’s general condition deteriorates. Within a few days, the swelling increases and a blackish furrow appears and the gangrenous process sets in and, after the scab falls away and a gaping hole is left in the face. It is estimated that the mortality rate reaches up to an alarming 90%.

The WHO estimates that 140,000 new cases of Noma occur each year and of these, a mere 10% survive. That means that 126,000 die each year, mainly in sub-Saharan countries from Senegal to Ethiopia, a region known as “the Noma belt”.

Source: The WHO.

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