Tag - Senegal

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Bicycles for Education
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Report of funding and monitoring the project: Solar equipment for the Agroforestry School of the Dindefelo Community
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New Sponsor : Uvinum
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The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
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Give a respite to the forest
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The great potential of agroforestry
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They require electrical equipment
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A group of chimpanzees released on Tchindzoulou Island
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The presence of the chimpanzee in Senegal

Bicycles for Education

capcelera

Bicicletassinfronteras-300x171Bicycles without Borders (Bicicletas sin Fronteras) in an organization that provides bicycles to people with no resources so they can travel to school or to their work place.

Their main activity takes place in Palmarin (Senegal) where, the maintenance of bicycles also generates employment among the population of the region. .

In line of their strong commitment to the use of bicycles as a social and work integration, Santa Fixie Group customers will raise funds so that the NGO can continue their task in Palmarin.

In particular, through their help, 25 children will be able to go to school and, as a result, improve their academic results.

Santafixie-GroupSanta Fixie Group starts this project after completing the last campaign in which all their customers raised funds in order to fight against school abandonment in rural areas from India (you can remember the project HERE).

Remember that, if you want, you can follow the donation process HERE.

Worldcoo Team

Report of funding and monitoring the project: Solar equipment for the Agroforestry School of the Dindefelo Community

In March, Uvinum began to collaborate with the Jane Goodall Institute in order to get funding for the “Solar equipment for the Agroforestry School of the Dindefelo Community” Project. The main aim for this project is to improve the quality of life of the population from Rural Community of Dindefelo and protect the biodiversity through sustainable management of agroforestry activities. For that, research and training infrastructures will be built.

In order to meet the project aims, the Agroforestry School has been equipped with solar equipment and an electric system has been installed to allow for an autonomous school management.

One of the commitments from Worldcoo is to monitor the funded projects and track every € donated by the users of our e-commerce with cause.

Thanks to Uvinum users, not only 50 farmers, 30 women, 15 local authorities from Dindefelo Reserve Management Committee and 20 tourist guide have been trained, 1.500 people from Dindefelo have also benefited thanks to use the installed electric system.

Final Report Uvinum - JaneGoodall

The Worldcoo team.

New Sponsor : Uvinum

Uvinum is Worldcoo’s brand new sponsor.

Uvinum is an innovative ecommerce founded in 2009 in Barcelona which provides a large and personalized selection of wines and other alcohols. It is part of Verticomm group, an ecommerce gathering that is expanding internationally to meet all your needs.

As a sponsor, they decided to support the project Solar equipment for the Agroforestry School of the Dindefelo Community  in Dindefelo, Senegal, carried out by the NGO Jane Goodall Institute. We thank them a lot!

Website of Uvinum: http://www.uvinum.es/

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

Since 1966 The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has been working within countries of need, so that they can individually become sustainable and the livings of those populating these countries are improved. Today the UNDP is aiding 177 countries and territories providing understandings to help lives and develop resilient nations.

An intention that the UNDP share, are the ‘Millennium Development Goals’ which achieved by 2015 would see:

  • An eradication of extreme poverty and hunger
  • Achievement of universal primary education
  • Promotion of gender equality
  • Deduction of infant mortality
  • Improvement of maternal health
  • Combating HIV/Aids, Malaria and other diseases
  • Assurance of  environmental sustainability
  • Development of global partnerships for development.

The UNDP teaches these countries how to use aid effectively so they can become sustainable. The UNDP has many ongoing projects, in countries like Gaza, South Sudan, Somalia, Afghanistan, Zambia, Indonesia, Haiti and Mali. A large proportion of these projects are focused on health especially relating to HIV/ Aids where their goal is to fight it globally, give aid quicker and strengthen hospitals. Other projects are based within the police force, fighting poverty, aiding refugees, improving transport and working with Law and Order to help prevent corruption.

This is a mission that is also shared with Worldcoo with the fundamental end goals of helping people’s lives, through educating about diseases, health, gender equality and basic human rights.

Like the UNDP, Worldcoo has been investing time into many projects like Agronomic Engineering in Diffa, Niger, where they aim to build a fence around the crop area to protect from animals during the harvest, which will be a benefit to many who are malnourished. Other projects are based in Vietnam, Senegal, Gambia and Nicaragua where there is an intention to improve sanitary conditions, aiding territories to become economically advanced and educational developments within schools.

The UNDP and other like-minded charities have a considerable task ahead of them to achieve the ‘Millennium Development Goals’, however seeing the achievements of the UNDP over the last 47 years the following two years are sure to be extremely productive.

 

The Worldcoo Team

 

 

Give a respite to the forest

Wild chimpanzees inhabiting in the Dindefelo Community Reserve, south of Senegal, depend almost exclusively on a fruit called Lare in the local language (Saba senegalensis) at the peak of the dry season. Not only is Lare a keystone resource for chimpanzees, but specifically for the families living in this area who derive a great percentage of their annual income from this wild fruit harvest. It is a very popular product in cities like Dakar, where it is consumed prepared as a juice or just raw. In the past two years  massive exploitation and uncontrolled bush fires have reduced into a minimum the amount of Lare in its natural habitat.

To solve this situation citizens of the Dindefelo Rural Community have taken an extraordinary and courageous decision based on the technical reports from the Jane Goodall Institute Spain (IJGE) and Management Committee Community Nature Reserve Dindefelo (RNCD): To set an ecological truce for the Lare extraction in all the forests of the Community during the year 2013.

This means that many families will no longer economically benefit from the Lare harvest, important income during the year. The role of the income generated by this harvest has an enormous effect on the economy of the harvesters and their families. Due to the Lare truce extraction this year, the Rural Community and the Jane Goodall Institute Spain are financially compensating the families involved. Also and most important, together, they are creating new sustainable alternatives to harvesting wild Lare: They have put in place Lare nursery beds and the saplings are being transplanted to reforest protected areas along with other wild species like Thiale (Spondias mombin), also eaten by chimpanzees. Families who harvested wild Lare are now responsible of taking care, growing and transplanting the Lare nurseries back into the forest.

We don’t know if it’s due to this program, but the fact is that the researchers from The Jane Goodall Institute working in the area have confirmed the return of the chimpanzees to certain important fruiting areas where there used to be conflicts between locals and chimpanzees themselves. Now everyone seems to be more at ease! You can see the video of the Dindefelo chimpanzees, caught on a camera trap put by the research team last week.

The great potential of agroforestry

When we talk about agroforestry, two main configurations are possible. The first one is to plant trees (in line) inside plowed and cultivated agricultural plots in a sustainable manner. The second one is to make cohabit trees and pets. Thus, the profitability of lands is improved because of a better organization.

In the case of the Wordcoo project located in Dindefelo’s Natural Reserve (Map), the electrical equipments required will be used to organize the agroforestry. They are absolutely necessary because the project consist also in building a school. Then, they will be able to manage natural resources in the best way (without waist), they will improve the food security, and they even will contribute to the endangered chimpanzee’s survival in the region.

All these developments will make Dindefelo a reference in West Africa for biodiversity.

Support the project right here, and share it with everybody!

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They require electrical equipment

The Jane Goodall Institute has a nice program to complete. Indeed, the association wants to create a center of research and training for Agroforestry Dindefelo School of the Community. Therefore, they need certain materials in particular.

Already funded some extent, part of the project has already been completed. It is the construction and structural work part. Now, to achieve their goal, they must equip school with electrical equipment.

In its budget, the project provides a very important part dedicated to energy. This is due to the fact that electrical installations are necessary for people to benefit from the basic equipments. We thus find in the list of stuff : solar panels, batteries, regulators, transformers, and various electrical installations.

Benefiting people are in full work, they can finally enjoy new equipment, but they still lack electrical installation. Help them to realize the project by talking about them and supporting the project on Worldcoo.

A group of chimpanzees released on Tchindzoulou Island

It’s been 20 years since the Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Center (TCRC) opened in the Republic of Congo. Dr. Jane Goodall founded the sanctuary to provide care and hope to the chimpanzee victims of the illegal commercial bush meat and pet trades. Today, many of the chimpanzee residents are adults who need to explore and expand their horizons beyond the boundaries of the existing facility. Recognizing this need, the Jane Goodall Institute (JGI) put a great deal of effort into creating a more natural environment for the Tchimpounga chimpanzees.

On September 20, 2012, after years of hard work and preparation, two female chimpanzees, Kudia and Vitika, were transferred from TCRC to JGI’s newly expanded sanctuary site on Tchindzoulou Island in the nearby Kouilou River. This wild place, composed of hundreds of hectares of tropical forest surrounded by river water, will be their new home.

A group of caregivers and veterinarians were in charge of bringing the chimpanzees to their new emplacement and all worked in the right way. It was the first time a group of chimpanzees released on Tchindzoulou Island.

Jane Goodall Institute publishes the amazing story about this trip.

For many years, the idea of transferring Tchimpounga’s chimps to a more natural environment has been a hope of everyone at JGI. Now, it has finally become a reality.

Source: Jane Goodall Institute

The presence of the chimpanzee in Senegal

“The presence of the chimpanzee in Senegal is strategic to secure its northernmost habitat, and it is also crucial to protect and restore if necessary the UICN’s priority area for chimpanzee conservation of the Fouta Jallon in Guinea”, reports Jane Goodall Institute NGO. The main threats faced by the chimpanzee in this territory are: deforestation and habitat degradation by human activities on top of logging (agriculture, farming, wild fruit gathering, and pollution of water courses).

The Jane Goodall Institute reports that the subspecies Pan Troglodytes Verus (West African Chimpanzee) is endangered in the region and presents reduced numbers in Senegal (ranging between 200 and 500 individuals), while numbers in Guinea are higher (between 17 and 22,000 individuals, UICN, 2004) although with an extremely high fragmentation of the habitat. JGI also appoints: “It is crucial to protect and restore if necessary the UICN’s priority area for chimpanzee conservation of the Fouta Jallon in Guinea”.

The Fouta is not only home to the biggest population of chimps in West Africa, it is also considered the water tower of the region. The three main rivers in the region have its source on the Fouta Jallon massif: the Gambia, the Senegal and the Niger River, providing the water needed in many countries from Mauritania to Nigeria that allows the subsistence of millions of Africans. “Protecting the Fouta’s forests is without doubt the most urgent priority in terms of human subsistence and biodiversity conservation in the region”, reports the JGI. Among other important species, “chimpanzee’s survival is especially critical due to several reasons”. To start with, chimpanzees attract tourism, which is an essential activity to improve life standards for the communities in the long term. Secondly, chimpanzees are one of the best indicators of the conservation status of the forests and the ecosystem in general. Finally, the Dindefelo’s Community Reserve, a protected area managed by the local population, is becoming one of the most important centers for nature research in the region and that will enhance the arrival of professors and students which will increase local capacities for better management of the environment. The Jane Goodall Institute concludes that “the recently created (2010) 13300 ha Community Reserve of Dindefelo, and its future cross border enlargement to reach around 74,000 ha on the Guinean side will help achieve both goals, for chimpanzee conservation and ecosystem protection and restoration”.

Source: Jane Goodall Institute.

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