Tag - Yegobecha

1
What Intermon Oxfam is really doing with my donation?
2
Ethiopia: one of the richest countries in water reserves, still has lots of people without drinking water access

What Intermon Oxfam is really doing with my donation?

Intermon Oxfam says that their objective in this project is “to improve the health status of 4.703 people in Yegobecha, by providing safe water access and the improvement of their hygiene habits”. But how is it possible? What they need to reach their aim?
The construction for the water prevision consists in different masonry structures to ensure clean water access within 20 minutes walking distance, and a minimum quantity of 15 litres per person and day. This masonry structures they want to build will be 9 water points where communities can go to get water; 9 anchor blocks to protect the pipeline system in steep terrains; 9 valve chambers to measure used water; and 8 km of trenches and water canalization.
Although, the project Intermon Oxfam is presenting in Worldcoo is the continuation of a different parts project, so there are things already constructed. This water supply system is an extension of a pipeline system financed by the Catalan Agency for Development Cooperation (ACCD).
Also, this project, promotes basic hygiene and sanitation habits for disease prevention, and trains the community on management for sanitation and hygiene issues.

Ethiopia: one of the richest countries in water reserves, still has lots of people without drinking water access

Yegobecha is situated in the North of Ethiopia, in the Southern Nation Nationalities and Peoples (SNNP) Region. This is a very poor region in a very poor country which only the 38 % of a more than 90M population has access to drinking water. This is one of the main problems in Ethiopia, although it is a country rich in water reserves (86% of the Nile River’s flow is originated in Ethiopia and there are abundant underground water basins). The problem is the lack of material, financial and human resources to construct infrastructures allowing water extraction from subsoil and, thus, making it available to the entire population.

Families in Yegobecha have an average number of 6 children and live from subsistence agriculture. Many men must migrate to other areas in search of extra work, as they don’t get enough income from work in land to buy basic goods. In this cases mothers take on the role of family chief, with 6 children in charge, besides doing household tasks, getting water and working the land. This supposes an overload of work which has different consequences, including that they are forced to take their children out of school to help with household tasks.

Also, 50% of the population lives within 10 km away from any basic services centre (health centres and schools). This means 2 hours by walking, as they do not have any other transportation facilities.

made with in BCN